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. california, hawaii, and mississippi are the only ones that haven't yet reported widespread activity but they probably will. five states went down in terms of the level of activity but four states also went up. it's a bit of a wash, wolf. we know the flu season started earlier. it's likely to end a little bit earlier as a result but we just have to collect some more data over the next couple of weeks, wolf. >> and that's what we'll do. we keep hearing that everyone still needs to get a flu shot, that it's not too late. but we're also hearing potentially about shortages. here's the question. is there enough vaccine to go around? >> yes, i believe so. but there's a micro way of looking at this and a macro. you have a certain amount of vaccine that is made and then you've got to sort of predict where it's going to be needed and how to distribute it around the country. a lot of this is based on utilization, flu vaccines in years passed past. 128 million doses distributed and 112 million vaccinated. those are actually pretty good numbers in terms of those that have been vaccinated. if you
to thank mr. palazzo from mississippi who offered important suggestions to improve this legislation. i'm proud to be a co-sponsor and these bipartisan federal emergency management agency and disaster recovery improvements will speed up and streamline hurricane sandy recovery efforts. they'll also and importantly reduce costs. we work to target improvements that will specifically help communities in the immediate aftermath of sandy. these: critical bipartisan reforms supported by fema and key experts and stakeholders, including, we understand, from fema administrator few gait that these -- fugate that these must happen by march 1. i worked on these issues since serving on the committee with the gentlelady from washington, d.c. eight years ago. at that time i witnessed the devastation following hurricane katrina. we saw our emergency management capability broke down and significant reforms were needed. we crafted legislation that put fema back together again within the department of homeland security, reformed and strengthened our response capability and created pilot programs to test in
. if you look at the con fliens of great water, the mississippi river, the states of florida, the yuck tan channel. you look at the biodiversity as well as mexico you look at the challenges between what i would call the interaction of the natural world and the manmade world. it's an important part of the world but a very complex part of the world when you bring in the economic and public infrastructure down there. what you get as we an increasing population and expansion that supports that population. you have increasing interaction with the natural environment. greater doge of complexity, we start to introduce concepts like climate change and conditions of uncertainty, the level of the types of events that can occur there in terms of the order of magnitude and the consequences grows. we know the frequency is increasing. and today we're going talk a little bit about the unique area of the world from a couple of different perspectives. i would like do you think about a couple of things as we do that. the first is overriding concept of resiliency. several months ago they produced a national
at that, look at mississippi congressman steve palaso. he pushed for storm relief in his area after hurricane katrina and isaac. he voted no for sandy relief because quote, we have a financial disaster looming in the country that i believe personally in my heart is going to be greater than any natural disaster that has ever hit us. now, today the paper ripped into palazzo. his hometown paper. for his vote against sandy relief. quote, seldom has a single vote in congress appeared as cold-blooded and hard headed as the one cast by representative steven palazzo last week. that he would rather make a philosophical point rather than help put back together communities. as he himself once put it is both shameful and offensive. this is an example of this kind of tea party ideology that just seems that people are not as important as the ideology even when they didn't feel that way under different circumstances, jackie. >> again, like we talked about the divide in the republican party, we saw a lot of east coast -- the republicans whose districts were effected by that really get very upset ab
and alabama, mississippi and louisiana, iowa and vermont, california and missouri in their times of need. now i trust they will stand with us. >> how do you argue with that? governor of new jersey chris christie giving his state of the state address earlier. and next week congress is set to vote on more disaster relief for victims of hurricane sandy. just last friday, congress approved a $9.7 billion measure that would provide some relief by keeping, just keeping the national flood insurance program solvent. that's what that vote was about. 67 members opposed the measure. they were all republican. over half of those no votes supported, yes, supported disaster relief in their own states. think progress compiled the list. among the bold faced names, here he is, paul ryan of wisconsin. you know, he voted no on sandy relief, yet asked for a disaster declaration following a flood in his home state of wisconsin? marsha blackburn of tennessee, she too voted no, asked for disaster assistance following a flood in tennessee. louie gohmert. you can always depend on a no vote there. he requested a broade
present. >> totally my treat. >> reporter: they have to go through orlando and mississippi. they feel like they're dating again because there are no kids here. >> first time in 20 years sense our kid was born that we took a vacation. >> reporter: he's probably mad he's not going. >> he used to go to all the ravens games with me but he's in college. >> we're looking forward to it. we're going to see everything in one day. >> reporter: or you can be a proud daughter whose dad got her there. >> never missed one on tv but never been to one in person. we will start the party tonight. >> reporter: delta had the most today with four fleets going direct but three were booked probably before the super bowl. roosevelt leftwich. >> what's a super bowl without ad fromly wager between the maryland zoo and san francisco zoo. the maryland zoo is home to rise and conquer, the official mascot. the san francisco zoo has on exhibit a young black rhino. if the 49ers win, the exhibit will be renamed the ravens exhibit for one day. if 49ers win, the ravens exhibit will be renamed. >>> our aren't company release
, the mississippi river, the straits of florida you look at the diversity in the gulf of mexico. then look at the challenges between, what i call the interaction between the man-made world and the natural world. this is a very important part of the world but also a very complex part of the world. what you get as we have an increasing population and expension of the infrastructure you have increasing interaction with the natural environment, greater degrees of complexity. when you introduce challenges like climate change and uncertainty, the level of the types of events that can occur there in terms of the magnitude and consequences grows. we know the frequency is increasing. we're going to talk about this unique area of the world from a couple of different perspectives. i would like you to think about a couple of things as we do this. this concept of restill yantcy. -- resiliantcy. having done many, many months in the gulf of several different disasters and crisis that were down there i came to think of resiliantcy similar to the human immune system. the pre-existing conditions are not cr
to the mississippi. 33 million tons of cargo come through here a year. do you think the port is a kind of leading indicator? >> we are-- we see a lot of things before i think it really hits the economy because when people are making decisions, they're making them months in advance to get them on board a ship. >> reporter: so what's happening now? >> right now, we're seeing things pick up. we're seeing more steel coming in. >> reporter: steel imports are up double digits. container traffic in the port of new orleans hit an all-time high in 2012, and cruise ship traffic also set a record. >> we're also seeing a large amount of exports, as well, so we feel very comfortable with the way things are going. >> reporter: the fed said today the pause in economic growth was due largely to weather-related disruptions from super storm sandy and other temporary factors. as one economist put it, it's the best contraction in the u.s. economy you're ever going to see. scott? >> pelley: anthony, you mentioned that federal spending, government spending, had dropped. how much does that have to do with this contract
freedom ring from every hill in mississippi. >> from every mountainside, let freedom ring. stannic and when this happens, when we allow freedom to ring from every village, every hamlet, every state and every city. >> we will be able to speed up that day when all of god's children, black men, white men, jews and gentiles, protestants, catholics will be able to join hands and sing in the words of old negro spiritual. >> free at last! free at last! thank god almighty, we are free at last! [applause] ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ with ♪ ♪ we are free, free at last ♪ we are free ♪ free at last ♪ ♪ ♪ [cheering] >> live pictures this afternoon at the lincoln memorial as we continue bringing shots from around the nation's capital on this inaugural weekend. fifth grade students from watkins elementary school on the national mall in washington giving the annual reading of dr. martin luther king i have a dream speech from august of 1963 kuran washington fifth. now to the white house where the crews have been working on audience bleachers and the reviewing stand in front of
the bill with $150 million for fishery disasters alaska and mississippi because it has extra money added in for other disasters that are not sandy-related it slows the progress of the bill and absolutely, the $9.7 billion, which was to basically, to fund the -- allow the national fund insurance program to borrow from the treasury, additional amount had to be done. we had to keep, just like the debt ceiling, we have to keep the full faith and credit of the u.s. government and we have to make sure we pay our bills and people bought flood insurance policies and paid their premiums, we need to pay those off. >> diane, i want to talk about flood insurance in a second so hold what thought. >> we'll go back to what happened with speaker boehner. i think what we saw on display that day was the worst kind of politics and the kind of thing that really turns people off to government in general and particularly to the congress right now. john boehner was not so much concerned about the vote on the sandy relief package but he was concerned about the vote on his leadership and he was more interested i
in mississippi. what we're building down there is an institute for modern slavery studies. if that voice is not put into all of this, it becomes an exercise in displacement and the revocation. that makes me and nationalist about the story but i want to tell about history here. when i was at the freedom center, standing at the wine bar, talking to two african american bartenders, they asked me why i was down there. i said and working for the national underground railroad for the center. their first reaction was, we don't care about that place, because they have moved away from our story. >> it is a much easier story to tell, but it does not challenge people. >> thanks. now you're doing research at a wine bar. i don't get it. [laughter] >> nice to meet you all. the one comment i would like to throw out there, bringing the survivor perspective into the discussion. the idea that these women did not see themselves as -- we served 500 people who have experienced what we're talking about today. there of all different descriptions. we have received about 3000 calls directly from people identifyi
the pool of providerers who can perform the procedure, but in mississippi, the state's only abortion provider is fighting to stay open as mi mississippi's republican governor vows to shut it down. according to the gutmacher institute, more than 87% of the counties lack abortion provider. the national network of abortion funds reports that every year 200,000 women need help paying for abortions in part because nearly half of american women who seek pregnancy termination live below the federal povrly line and this lack of access can be deadly for women. before roe v. wade, complications of abortion were the leading cause of death for women of child-bearing age and especially true of women of color. so as this access is narrowed, it puts pressure on the bodily rights of women and we can not forget the issue of access. we are joined by chloe angyal and also katrina vanden houvel, and bob herbert who is senior fellow at demos, and access is what we should be fighting to the. >> yes. what people don't know after the roe v. wade, hyde amendment was passed a and that prevented medicaid from
. the beneficiaries that are targeted underserved communities in louisiana, mississippi, alabama, and the florida panhandle. there are four components to this. the first is a program serving the developing improved community health programs. it is run by louisiana public health institute joined with the alliance institute which is a community-based organization. there is a mental and behavioral health program which has louisiana state university, southern mississippi university, the university of south alabama and the university of west florida. there is a literacy program which includes a washington- based group. that's got the literacy aimed at the literacy of the community and the community workers and those involved in with community activism and community projects. finally, there is a community health worker training program that is based at the university of south alabama. the overall goal here is one where resilience comes up in the language all the time but the resilience is very much in keeping with what we would do in public health. yesterday there was a meeting held at e.p.a. by the e.
of it is what you described. it's fisheries in mississippi. i know sandy was big, but i don't think it hit alaska and it didn't hit mississippi. the roof tops in the the district of columbia, about half of what harry reid calls an emergency is pork. >> sean: now, this is obviously an abuse of power by the democrats. why do you think, congressman, that they did this? >> because they can. because nobody calls them on it. because those of house voted no today, for instance, because we had the unmitigated termerity to ask for an offset. frankly, governor christie wants to bully and berate and badger people into passing a bill no matter how pork-laden it is. we're 16 trillion dollars in debt and i don't think it's asking too much that we found offset, waste, fraud abuse, duplicative programming, something to pay for the 9 billion dollars that we spent today instead of mortgaging the future of our kids. i don't think it's too much to ask. >> sean: first of all, they should have moved quicker than this as the president promised he would do and secondly, i don't think that the people of the rockaw
for the victims of hurricane sandy. >>> and big surprise, a mississip mississippi congressman who begged, begged for katrina money had the nerve to vote against sandy money, which got him little bit of attention from john stewart. that is coming up. ♪ i wish my patients could see what i see. ♪ that over time, having high cholesterol and any of these risk factors can put them at increased risk for plaque buildup in their arteries. so it's even more important to lower their cholesterol, and that's why, when diet and exercise alone aren't enough, i prescribe crestor. in a clinical trial versus lipitor, crestor got more high-risk patients' bad cholesterol to a goal of under 100. [ female announcer ] crestor is not right for everyone. like people with liver disease or women who are nursing, pregnant or may become pregnant. tell your doctor about other medicines you're taking. call your doctor right away if you have muscle pain or weakness, feel unusually tired, have loss of appetite, upper belly pain, dark urine or yellowing of skin or eyes. these could be signs of rare but serious side effects.
you look like the anti-choice proposals already in 2013. mississippi and virginia. strict new regulations are going to shut down abortion clinics. texas, arizona and wisconsin, legislators are pushing 20-week fetal pain abortion bans. and in wisconsin, taking a cue from virginia, they're going to introduce a forced ultrasound bill. they're moving forward, laura. >> absolutely. they're moving forward everywhere. you can go on and on. the heartbeat bill in ohio, some of these bills are getting more extreme. someone in michigan introduced a bill that was giving tax credit to fetuses. i think they're not slowing down at all, but it's really interesting that these anti-choice majorities were reelected, considering in some of these states, for instance, ohio, there was an exit poll that show that the majority of ohioans are pretty pro-choice. and they managed to reelect this in both chambers. it seems to me that it has to do with the way the districts were drawn up. >> when you look at the texas governor's rick perry's pledge just lags month, it showed where the gop's priorities lie
for the victims of hurricane sandy. >>> and big surprise, a mississippi congressman who begged, begged for katrina money had the nerve to vote against sandy money, which got him little bit of attention from john stewart. that is coming up. [ male announcer ] this is joe woods' first day of work. and his new boss told him two things -- cook what you love, and save your money. joe doesn't know it yet, but he'll work his way up from busser to waiter to chef before opening a restaurant specializing in fish and game from the great northwest. he'll start investing early, he'll find some good people to help guide him, and he'll set money aside from his first day of work to his last, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. it's just common sense. iimagine living your life withss less chronic low back pain.. imagine you with less pain. cymbalta can help. cymbalta is fda-approved to manage chronic musculoskeletal pain. one non-narcotic pill a day, every day, can help reduce this pain. tell your doctor right away if your mood worsens, you have unusual changes in mood or behavi
short-changed. we have stood with the citizens of florida and alabama, mississippi and louisiana, iowa and vermont, california and missouri, in their times of need. now i trust they will stand with us. >> he also said washington could learn a thing or two from new jersey about the art of compromise. >> now, we've had our fights. and we have stuck to our principles. but we have established a governing model for america that shows that even with heartfelt beliefs, bipartisan compromise is possible. achievement is the result. and progress for our people is the payoff. maybe the folks in washington in both parties could learn something from our record here in new jersey. >> you know, jon meacham, dana millbank who occasionally writes a snarky column or two in "the washington post" actually offered a fairly broad support of embrace of chris christie as the republican party savior, for obvious reasons. he says this. certainly the storm and more important, christie's forceful response boosted the governor's standing. but the tea party's record lows and christie's record highs tell a larger st
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in the state to enforce new gun laws. in mississippi, the governor had a similar idea, urging the legislature to prohibit the enforcement of any federal laws obama could get passed. >> i support the current laws. i don't think we need to change anything at all. >> reporter: the ferocity of the opposition does not surprise the white house. it's been nearly two decades since any new gun laws have been passed. >> we suffered too much pain and we care too much about our children to allow this to continue. >> reporter: ban on assault weapons and require background checks on all gun sales are things the nra is adamantly opposed to and vows to fight. >> there's people that care deeply about their second amendment rights and are not going to vote for politicians who sell them out. >> reporter: in recent polls, a significant majority of the public supports each of the major elements of the president's plan. that's why the white house plans to launch an all-out public campaign to support it, tapping into that grassroots network that helped the president win re-election. george? >> they're going to need
republicans are from hurricane regions. one from mississippi called for more help just last year for katrina relief. but opposed sandy relief, making him a target for skewering. >> many of my constituents in mississippi are still dealing with the effects of hurricane katrina. >> it's someone else's constituents in new york. instead of seven years later, it's two months later. >> reporter: that kind of talk sets off new jersey's governor chris christie. >> we sent the mayor to do the work for us. not to sit down there and play with each other. >> reporter: but republicans want specifics. we asked christie's office three times to explain their request. nearly $5 billion for housing. is that temporary housing, rebuilding homes or loans? and $700 million for what is called individual assistance. is that food, rent, actual payments or loans? christie's office has not answered any of those questions. the bill will be debated on tuesday and we expect a vote on wednesday. david kerley, abc news, the white house. >> wow. interesting stat here. gop house members last week filed 45 amendments to the un
to 10. 83 to 10 down south. the delegations from alabama, mississippi, georgia, virginia, tennessee, and south carolina were unanimously opposed. in the east, the northeast, house republicans were 24 to 1 in favor, with new york and pennsylvania unanimous. well, the danger for the gop is it's becoming a religious sectional ultraconservative party great at winning and holding gerrymandered seats but too willing to sacrifice entire regions of the country. former congressman chris shays is a republican from connecticut, and howard fineman is editorial director of "the huffington post" as well as an msnbc political analyst and our pal and my pal. look, chris shays, it's great to have you on because you have always been my notion of a reasonable moderate republican from the moderate reasonable part of the country, meaning connecticut. see how i warm you up here? now my question is why have you guys been abandoned by the southern crowd? it's almost like the civil war went the other way, and the south somehow took over the party of lincoln, not that there's anything wrong with the south, b
here and supported alabama, i supported mississippi, i supported texas, i was hoping that by now the northeast part of this country would have -- congress would have acted. it's been 77 days. those people are hurting. people in my district still can't get back to their homes and here we are in the last congress we just didn't do anything about it. now we're moving forward and hopefully january 15 we can get the rest of the money so those people that are suffering from all these states hit by this storm can get their lives back together again and i thank you, i yield back. >> gentleman yields back. does the gentleman from new jersey continue to reserve? >> i yield one minute for his floor debate, the gentleman from new york, sean patrick maloney. >> the gentleman from new york is recognized for one minute. >> madam speaker, my name is sean patrick maloney. i'm new here. i don't know all the rules of washington but it seems like the rule here is to put off till tomorrow what should be done today even when our fellow americans are suffering. a long time ago i honored from my mom and
. >> stephanie: alabama. [ ♪ "world news tonight" ♪ ] if you have to guess -- mississippi? alabama? >> one of those. first two guesses for right wing nimrods proposing ridiculous things. arming teachers, despite opposition from school officials. oh boy. alabama lawmakers state representative carrie rich please and thank you plans to arm teachers and principals next week despite the opposition of school administrators and oh, here's an added bonus to his plan. it does not seem to provide for any training. >> oh, great. >> because that would cost money. >> who's going to buy the firearms for all of the teachers? >> stephanie: i think he's a little doughy -- >> don't they need some time to actually get acquainted with the gun? use it -- maybe do some target practice? >> stephanie: no no. >> more than once a year? >> stephanie: anyway, love this piece by elizabeth rosenthal. we'll post it. more guns equals more killings. >> it is already posted on your facebook page. [ ♪ magic wand ♪ ] >> stephanie: it is like magic! seriously, when all of this first happened and we looked at all of the st
years in terms of rebuilding. we have seen that in louisiana and mississippi. we are still in mississippi, we're still working with the state to provide assistance to homeowners that are still rehabilitating their home. so we cannot wait really any longer to start -- >> is it fair to say a delayed recovery is a failed recovery speak with a delayed recovery is a failed recovery. recovery that doesn't allow for communities to plan for the range of means, understanding that it may take five to 10 years to recover, we would also say it is failed. >> administrator, taking off from the secretary's comments about the regional economy within the complex -- transportation is a critical element, is it not, if getting people to work, getting a workforce to their job, being able to great productivity, being able to drive a better bottom line, being able to move an economy? i think sometimes we think maybe another part of the country, transportation and particularly transit, in some types of luxury. but isn't it a necessity to economic success? >> it absolutely is, mr. chairman, but now
come to the gulf, you'll have a great time. especially in alabama. you mean mississippi. that's florida. say louisiana or there's no dessert. brought to you by bp and all of us who call the gulf home. i took my son fishing every year. we had a great spot, not easy to find, but worth it. but with copd making it hard to breathe, i thought those days might be over. so my doctor prescribed symbicort. it helps significantly improve my lung function starting within five minutes. symbicort doesn't replace a rescue inhaler for sudden symptoms. with symbicort, today i'm breathing better. and that means...fish on! symbicort is for copd including chronic bronchitis and emphysema. it should not be taken more than twice a day. symbicort may increase your risk of lung infections, osteoporosis, and some eye problems. tell your doctor if you have a heart condition or high blood pressure before taking it. with copd, i thought i'd miss our family tradition. now symbicort significantly improves my lung function, starting within 5 minutes. and that makes a difference in my breathing. today, we're ready for
orleans, pascagula and gulf port, mississippi. we thought we had dodged the bullet and then the levies broke and who would have predicted that there was a sea of humanity in the super dome that basically was in extreme miss? who would have predicted in this day and age we would lose many, many people based on the fact they couldn't be medevacked, that the hospitals themselves had been flooded and the hospital staff was having to carry critically ill patients up to the top floors to avoid the water that was filling in the rooms. who would have predicted that? and were we set up to handle that? and who would have predicted in the early goings there would be civic disorder and civic disobedience and lack of command and control and then the military came there and provided that stability for a while until the civic authorities took over and eventually got things moving in a fairly organized continuum. we learned a tremendous amount of lessons from that, lessons that i hope no other city will ever have to repeat again. but the bottom line is it is so critical at this point to talk about
in the missouri and mississippi valleys. hurricanes in louisiana or florida. and other disasters. we've sent our tax dollars, billions of them. and now all of a sudden some are suggesting we should change the rules when we are hit by the first major disaster to hit the new york city region in a very long time. that's not fair. that's not right. and we have argued against it, and i hope my colleagues will defeat the lee amendment. and i also say to my colleagues that this is not just dollars and cents. these are people who care, are waiting, homeowners waiting to rebuild their homes. they haven't moved back in. small business owners who are hanging on by a thread after building a business for 25 years. we know when the hand of god strikes, it's overwhelming for them. take rita from emerald magic lawn care. her company helps local families, schools and businesses with lawn care in the spring and summer and around the holidays they help with decorations and lights. but emerald magic's business was interrupted for many weeks. the client base dried up. rita's business will be in huge trouble. it may
out of the south into the southern plains and mississippi valley. a large storm system will hit the midwest with snow, heavy rain and severe thunderstorms today and tomorrow. and up to 20 inches of snow is possible in the mountains of the pacific northwest and the rockies. >>> in sports now, get ready for some colorful stories, outrageous quotes, and a lot of talk about the harbaugh brothers coaching against each other for the super bowl xlvii. today is media day when players and coaches from both teams make themselves available to scores of reporters. on monday, the baltimore ravens arrived in new orleans. their opponents, the san francisco 49ers, made it to town on sunday. this is baltimore's first trip to the super bowl since 2001. >>> it has been almost as long, 11 years, since the city of new orleans hosted the super bowl. and getting the big game back to the big easy has been a difficult task. vinita nair has more. good morning. >> reporter: good morning. as if the super bowl is not the most hyped sporting event in the world, media day is a close second.
, louisiana, mississippi, texas. we didn't ask questions. we just stopped and delivered aid to those in need. this is important, it is important that members who have been the benefactor of our goodwill in the past remember this generosity when voting today. . almost three months later and my constituents continue to suffer. i urge passage of the rule and underlying bill and yield back the balance of my time. the chair: the gentleman from the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from yields back. the gentlelady from new york. ms. slaughter: i'm pleased to yield 1 1/2 minutes to the gentleman from new jersey, mr. andrews. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from new jersey is recognized for 1 1/2 minutes. mr. andrews: i ask unanimous consent to revise and extend my remarks. the speaker pro tempore: without objection. mr. andrews: i thank my friend for yielding. 78 days ago a tremendous force of fury hit the northeastern region of the united states. today we make an act of national interest. this is not an act of excess or an act of charity. for those who claim that there is excess in this bi
to reapply, there's about 56 of them in louisiana and mississippi, to reapply for loan forgiveness. it would be up to about $400 million up to the communities to apply including about 30 million that they've already paid us in principal and interest. so to me this is something that really shouldn't be in this bill. i'm not saying that it -- it may be important, may be critical but not part of the sandy supplemental. host: so if i'm hearing you correctly, there are things designated emergency within this but not necessarily specific to sandy. guest: right. and there are things in here where they're nice to have. for instance, even going all the way down to the small there's $20,000 for the department of justice inspector general to replace cars that were damaged by sandy i guess, i mean new equipment. well, the justice department has more than 40,000 vehicles. but i kind of think that they could take one out? this shouldn't be viewed as free money. that was proposed by the administration. it's also people in the administration wanting to feather their nest as well. host: as far as your analys
and alabama and mississippi in katrina. what was done in joplin, missouri. what was done in the floods in iowa. we don't expect anything more than that, but we will not accept anything less. and if they want to make new rules about disasters, well, they picked the wrong state to make the new rules with. >> that's jersey talking. joining me now is new york congressman steve israel, congressman from new york who represents areas hard hit by superstorm sandy. steve, thank you so much, congressman, for coming on. >> sure, chris. >> you're a partisan democrat, fair enough. let's talk about this issue as a national thing. why new york, i thought they got great media coverage, when you have a baseball star in new york, they're national figures, just huge, but yet this time i do think that the media is undercut. i'm as guilty as anybody for not seeing what's right in front of our eyes, and for some reason it hasn't gotten the pictures on tv as much as, you know, katrina did. i have learned on the ground what it's like. there's some pictures we're showing now, and it ain't going away. this is a horror
every time to louisiana, alabama, florida, mississippi, missouri, alabama have needed aid for disasters. new jersey and new york's representatives regardless of party have stood up for them. it's now time for them to stand up for this region of the country as well. this should not be subject to politics. this is a basic function of government. and yeah i'm concerned about it, because every day it doesn't happen is a day it doesn't happen. i can't take anybody's assurances anymore. \[inaudible question] >> my understanding is that the flood insurance program will run out of money next week if not refinanced by congress. and so the speaker's irresponsible action in not moving on anything at least appears from the information i have been given will leave the flood insurance program broke by the end of next week. \[inaudible question] >> i'm not concerned about that, but more the indecision that's the problem. we found in nondisaster-related times, the fact is they couldn't make a decision. so businesses sat for months and months and months waiting to be made. sitting on the governor's desk
of florida, alabama, mississippi, louisiana, iowa, vermont, california and missouri in their times of need. now i trust that they will stand with us. so make no mistake. new jersey's spirit has never been stronger. our resolve never more firm. our unity never more obvious. let there also be no mistake -- much work still lies ahead. damage that comes only once in a century will take in some cases years to repair. here is some of what we have done already -- we have created a cabinet-level position to coordinate the state's efforts across every agency, and marc ferzan is here today, ready to work with you on this restoration effort. we've requested the federal government to pay 100% of the costs of the significant debris removal that we require -- and have already received $18 million for that task. we have secured $20 million from the federal highway administration for emergency repair of our roads, bridges and tunnels -- a down payment on a major infrastructure task ahead. we have directed our department of environmental protection to streamline approvals for restoring critical infrastruct
the tradition of providing relief. we have stood with the citizens of florida, alabama, mississippi, louisiana, iowa, vermont, california and missouri in their times of need. with us. [applause] [applause] so make no mistake. new jersey's spirit has never been stronger. our resolve never more firm. our unity never more obvious. let there also be no mistake -- much work still lies ahead. damage that comes only once in a century will take in some cases years to repair. here is some of what we have done already -- we have created a cabinet-level position to coordinate the state's efforts across every agency, and marc ferzan is here today, ready to work with you on this restoration effort. we've requested the federal government to pay 100% of the costs of the significant debris removal that we require -- and have already received $18 million for that task. we have secured $20 million from the federal highway administration for emergency repair of our roads, bridges and tunnels -- a down payment on a major infrastructure task ahead. we have directed our department of environmental protection to str
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